Bathing self-care deficit

Bathing self-care deficit

Domain 4. Activity-rest
Class 5. Self-care
Diagnostic Code: 00108
Nanda label: Bathing self-care deficit
Diagnostic focus: Bathing self-care

Nursing diagnosis is an important component of the nursing process. It is used to identify, diagnose and manage conditions and problems related to health care. A nursing diagnosis focuses on the patient’s experience, acknowledges their individual needs and helps guide their care plans. When dealing with a bathing self-care deficit, it is important to accurately diagnose the problem so that appropriate interventions can be implemented.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition

NANDA International stands for North American Nursing Diagnosis Association and it is the standard used by nurses to classify the diagnosis. The NANDA nursing diagnosis for bathing self-care deficit includes the following:

  • Bathing/Hygiene Self-Care Deficit: “A state in which an individual is unable to perform or initiate activities of daily self-care including bathing, grooming, and hygiene.”

Defining Characteristics

Subjective defining characteristics of bathing self-care deficit may include the following:

  • Complains of feeling “dirty”
  • Expresses fear of bathing or feeling overwhelmed about bathing
  • Has difficulty remembering bathing routines or task sequences
  • Reports feeling anxious or agitated during bathing

Objective defining characteristics may include the following:

  • Poor hygiene
  • Physically unable to bathe self (e.g. impaired mobility, wheelchair-bound, disabled)
  • Body odor
  • Unkempt appearance

Related Factors

There are a variety of related factors that may contribute to a person’s inability to meet their own bathing needs. These include:

  • Physical impairment or disability
  • Cognitive impairment (e.g. dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease)
  • Chronic pain
  • Anxiety, depression or other mental health issues
  • Medications with side effects that lead to fatigue or drowsiness
  • Agitation caused by environment or lack of familiarity

At Risk Population

There are certain populations at higher risk for developing a bathing self-care deficit. These include individuals who are elderly, chronically ill, disabled, or living in a long-term care facility. People who have cognitive impairments or disabilities associated with aging are also at an increased risk.

Associated Conditions

Bathing self-care deficits can increase the risk of developing any of the following associated conditions:

  • Skin infections
  • Pressure sores
  • Falls
  • Dehydration
  • Malnutrition

Suggestions for Use

It is important to use best practices when working with a patient who has a bathing self-care deficit. This includes:

  • Assessing the reason for the deficit, whether physical or psychological, and providing interventions that are tailored to the individual
  • Creating a safe, comfortable and private bathing environment
  • Providing appropriate assistive devices and adaptive techniques, when necessary
  • Assisting with the bathing activity while allowing the patient to maintain as much independence as possible
  • Encouraging the patient with positive feedback throughout the process

Suggested Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnosis

For patients who are unable to independently perform or initiate self-care activities related to bathing, these alternate NANDA nursing diagnoses can be used instead:

  • Activity Intolerance
  • Impaired Verbal Communication
  • Readiness for Enhanced Self-Care
  • Delayed Growth and Development

Usage Tips

When caring for a patient with a bathing self-care deficit, it is important to keep these tips in mind:

  • Show patient respect and compassion.
  • Allow them to perform some activities by themselves, if possible.
  • Offer encouragement and encouragement.
  • Take all safety precautions to ensure the patient does not get injured.

NOC Outcomes

The following are examples of NOC Outcomes (Nursing Outcome Classification) that may be used to evaluate the success of interventions for a patient with a bathing self-care deficit:

  • Personal Hygiene Self-Care: Ability to Adequately Perform Tasks of Daily Living This outcome evaluates whether the individual is able to perform self-care tasks such as bathing.
  • Self-Care: Advanced Level This evaluates whether the patient is able to perform activities of daily living independently.
  • Activity Wheezing: Patient Engages in Habitual Quality Rounds This outcome evaluates whether patients have developed regular schedules of being cleaned and dressed.
  • Pain Management: Nursing Intervention This measures the ability of the patient to actively participate in strategies to manage pain associated with bathing.

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria

The goal of nurses who are treating a patient with a bathing self-care deficit should be to enable the patient to care for their own hygiene needs safely and independently. Evaluation criteria for determining the success of this goal should focus on the patient’s behavior, ability to perform activities, psychological wellbeing, and overall quality of life.

NIC Interventions

NIC interventions (Nursing Interventions Classification) are interventions that are used to help improve a patient’s experience. Examples of appropriate NIC interventions for a patient with a bathing self-care deficit may include:

  • Safety Evaluation: Assessment of the environment to ensure it is safe and adequate for bathing purposes.
  • Assistive Device Use: Assistance with using any necessary devices (such as reachers, bath chairs, walkers, etc.) to aid in performing activities of daily living.
  •  Comfort Measures: Promoting relaxation techniques and providing massage or other comfort measures to reduce anxiety associated with bathing.

Nursing Activities

Nurses caring for a patient with a bathing self-care deficit must complete the following activities in order to treat the condition:

  • Assess the cause and severity of the deficit
  • Assess the patient’s physical, cognitive, and emotional abilities
  • Develop a plan of care to address the deficit
  • Implement interventions to address the deficit
  • Monitor and evaluate the interventions
  • Reassess the patient’s response to interventions

Conclusion

When treating a patient with a bathing self-care deficit, it is important to accurately diagnose the problem and develop a plan of care that is tailored to the individual. Nurses should focus on utilizing best practices, providing comfort measures, and involving the patient in their care in order to effectively address the problem.

FAQs

  • 1. What is a Nursing Diagnosis?
    A nursing diagnosis is an assessment of a patient’s condition and an identification of the individual’s needs related to health care. It is part of the nursing process and is used to guide care plans.
  • 2. What is the NANDA Nursing Diagnosis for bathing self-care deficit?
    The NANDA nursing diagnosis for bathing self-care deficit is Bathing/Hygiene Self Care Deficit: “A state in which an individual is unable to perform or initiate activities of daily self-care including bathing, grooming, and hygiene.”
  • 3. What are some associated conditions of a bathing self-care deficit?
    Some associated conditions of a bathing self-care deficit include skin infections, pressure sores, falls, dehydration, and malnutrition.
  • 4. What are some suggested NIC Interventions for a bathing self-care deficit?
    Suggested NIC interventions for a bathing self-care deficit include safety evaluation, assistive device use, comfort measures, and pain management.
  • 5. What are some nursing activities for treating a bathing self-care deficit?
    Nursing activities for treating a bathing self-care deficit include assessing the cause and severity of the deficit, developing a plan of care, implementing interventions, monitoring and evaluating interventions, and reassessing the patient’s response.