Decreased activity tolerance

Decreased activity tolerance

Domain 4. Activity-rest
Class 2. Activity-exercise
Diagnostic Code: 00298
Nanda label: Decreased activity tolerance
Diagnostic focus: Activity tolerance

Nursing Diagnosis Decreased Activity Tolerance

Introduction

Decreased activity tolerance is a common nursing diagnosis that applies when a patient experiences a decrease in their ability or comfort limit to perform physical activities. This can be caused by a variety of factors, including pain, fatigue, immobility, and environmental conditions. Nurses play an integral role in identifying and assessing the symptoms associated with this diagnosis and providing tailored interventions to support improved activities.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition

NANDA International (NANDA-I) defines decreased activity tolerance as a decrease in the ability or comfort level to engage in physical activities. This is usually due to some degree of discomfort stemming from pain, fatigue, immobility, or environmental conditions.

Defining Characteristics

Subjective symptoms of decreased activity tolerance include complaints of sudden weakness, fatigue, inability to concentrate, lack of motivation, confusion, anxiety, and lack of energy. Objective symptoms such as labored breathing, tachycardia, increased heart rate, and swollen extremities may also occur.

Related Factors

Decreased activity tolerance can be caused by many different factors. These can include physical illness or injury, inadequate nutrition, dehydration, reduced oxygen levels, muscle fatigue, anemia, poor circulation, medications, or certain cognitive impairments. Additionally, psychological and emotional factors such as depression, anxiety, stress, and lack of support are also thought to contribute to decreased activity tolerance.

At Risk Population

Some populations are more prone to experience decreased activity tolerance than others. These include elderly individuals, those with chronic illnesses, those with frail physical or mental health, those with disabilities, athletes, pregnant women, and those who are bedridden.

Associated Conditions

Decreased activity tolerance can lead to further complications and conditions, including sleep disturbances, overeating, impaired cognitive functioning, muscle injury, and anxiety or depression.

Suggestions for Use

Nurses are encouraged to assess any potential factors contributing to decreased activity tolerance in their patients. This includes factors like general health, diet, and lifestyle habits. They should also evaluate the patient’s current level of physical and mental function in order to provide tailored treatments to improve and restore activity levels.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnosis

Alternative nursing diagnoses related to decreased activity tolerance include: Physical Activity – Exercise Intolerance, Social Isolation, Powerlessness, and Risk for Injury.

Usage Tips

When caring for patients with decreased activity tolerance, it is important to encourage moderate exercise and activity that falls within the patient’s individual comfort zone. The nurse should also monitor symptoms closely while looking out for behaviors or situations that might trigger fatigue or restlessness.

NOC Outcomes

NOC outcomes associated with decreased activity tolerance include: Strength, Endurance, Activity Tolerance, Cardiac Output, Respiratory Status: Ventilation, and Comfort Level.

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria

In order to evaluate decreased activity tolerance, nurses should observe changes in physical functioning, exercise levels, and self-care activity. They may also use questionnaires, interviews, and other assessment tools to gather information about functional skills and activity levels.

NIC Interventions

NIC interventions associated with decreased activity tolerance include: Activity Therapy, Restorative Care, Exercise Training, Energy Conservation, Home Maintenance Management, Self-Care Assistance, Environmental Management, Pain Management, and Patient Teaching.

Nursing Activities

Nursing activities for decreased activity tolerance involve evaluating the patient’s current level of physical and mental functioning, monitoring for fatigue, encouraging moderate physical activity, educating the patient about energy conservation techniques, and providing appropriate interventions to improve activity levels.

Conclusion

Decreased activity tolerance is a common nursing diagnosis that applies when a patient experiences a decrease in their ability or comfort level to engage in physical activities. It is caused by a variety of factors that must be evaluated and managed by nurses in order to promote better long-term health and activity outcomes.

5 FAQs

  • What is decreased activity tolerance? Decreased activity tolerance is a nursing diagnosis referring to a decrease in the ability or comfort level to engage in physical activities and can be caused by physical illness or injury, inadequate nutrition, dehydration, medications, and certain cognitive impairments.
  • Who is at risk for decreased activity tolerance? Elderly individuals, those with chronic illnesses, those with frail physical or mental health, those with disabilities, athletes, pregnant women, and those who are bedridden are all at higher risk for experiencing decreased activity tolerance.
  • What are some associated conditions of decreased activity tolerance? Some associated conditions of decreased activity tolerance include sleep disturbances, overeating, impaired cognitive functioning, muscle injury, and anxiety or depression.
  • What interventions are used to manage decreased activity tolerance?Interventions used to manage decreased activity tolerance include activity therapy, restorative care, exercise training, energy conservation, home maintenance management, self-care assistance, environmental management, pain management, and patient teaching.
  • How can nurses help to improve activity levels? To improve activity levels, nurses should encourage moderate physical activity within the patient’s comfort zone, monitor for any signs of fatigue or restlessness, and provide education on energy conservation techniques.

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