Disturbed personal identity

Disturbed personal identity

Domain 6. Self-perception
Class 1. Self-concept
Diagnostic Code: 00121
Nanda label: Disturbed personal identity
Diagnostic focus: Personal identity

Personal identity refers to how an individual perceives and identifies themselves. It is the unique way each person views themselves, which includes physical attributes, spiritual beliefs, and psychological characteristics. Nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity may occur when there is a disruption in the development or maintenance of an individual’s identity. This can happen due to physical or mental health issues, or because of changes in one’s environment or relationships. In this article, we discuss the definition of nursing diagnosis for disturbed personal identity, defining characteristics, related factors, at-risk populations, associated conditions, and suggested uses of this nursing diagnosis. We provide tips for usage and suggest alternatives, as well as list out Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC) outcomes and Nursing Interventional Classification (NIC) interventions.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition

Nursing diagnosis for disturbed personal identity is defined by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) as “a vague sense of self leading to a loss of direction and purpose and deficits in self-esteem”. This diagnosis usually occurs when an individual experiences confusion or doubt as to who they are and what their purpose is in life.

Defining Characteristics

The defining characteristics of disturbed personal identity nursing diagnosis include both subjective and objective signs and symptoms. Subjective indicators may include feelings of emptiness, confusion, disorientation, emptiness, or despair; loss of customary habits or routines; and a lack of beliefs or values that are typically deeply-held. Objectively, the nurse may be able to observe changes in self-care activities, associating with negative peers, or avoidance of traditional or expected values and behaviors.

Related Factors

Personality changes, life transitions, relocation, self-identity crises, illness, aging, and significant relationship events, can all act as related factors, contributing to nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity. These related factors can be further broken down into mental, emotional, social, intellectual, and spiritual specific components. Additionally, certain physical illnesses and disorders can have an effect on personal identity, causing changes in emotional expression, perspective, motivation, and overall wellbeing.

At Risk Population

Individuals who are typically deemed “at-risk” for nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity include those who experience depression, anxiety, drug or alcohol abuse, PTSD, major life changes, growing older, or any serious medical conditions. Additionally, individuals who have experienced significant trauma or any sort of abuse may be at greater risk for developing issues with their personal identity.

Associated Conditions

As previously mentioned, there are both physical and mental conditions that can lead to the development of disturbed personal identity nursing diagnosis. Physically, conditions such as diabetes, obesity, obesity, chronic pain, neurological disorders, and dementia can all lead to changes in self-esteem, empowerment, and identity. Emotionally, depression, fatigue, fear, and grief can all have a negative impact on someone’s sense of self.

Suggestions of Use

Nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity can be used when examining clinical signs, symptoms, and health histories to determine the potential underlying cause and effects of an individual’s symptoms. The diagnosis can also be helpful in identifying effective care strategies or treatments for clients or patients.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnoses

Alternative nursing diagnoses for disturbed personal identity include providing support systems, assessing spirituality, avoiding isolation, coping strategy facilitation, and establishing achievable goals. These alternative diagnoses provide the opportunity to identify and implement interventions that are more effective than focusing solely on the nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity.

Usage Tips

Nurses should consider several factors when applying this nursing diagnosis in practice. First, assessment should focus on the client’s thoughts and feelings, as well as documented evidence in their history. It is also important to assess the home environment, lifestyle, and health status in order to identify risk factors and associated conditions. Additionally, nurses should strive to build trust and rapports with the patient when exploring the potential diagnoses.

NOC Outcomes

The list of Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC) outcomes that are associated with nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity includes: self-esteem, self-concept, patient satisfaction, self-efficacy, personal values, and patient stability.

  • Self-Esteem –This outcome reflects a patient’s feeling of self-worth and acceptance.
  • Self-Concept – This outcome focuses on how a patient sees themselves in terms of abilities, strengths, weaknesses, and physical traits.
  • Patient Satisfaction – This outcome examines a patient’s level of satisfaction with the care they receive.
  • Self-Efficacy – This outcome looks at how confident a patient believes they are, and their capability to take action when needed.
  • Personal Values – This outcome measures a patient’s ability to prioritize their values, and remain true to them.
  • Patient Stability – This outcome indicates a patient’s general level of stability.

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria

When evaluating the success of nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity, nurses should use patient interviews, physical assessments, and other evaluation tools. Additionally, nurses should use appropriate observation techniques to assess the patient’s behavior, interactions, and overall functioning. The following criteria should be considered when evaluating a patient’s progress: improved self-confidence, better understanding of self-identity, participation in activities that are meaningful, increase in personal values, and improved decision making and problem-solving.

NIC Interventions

The list of Nursing Interventional Classification (NIC) interventions that are associated with nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity include: self-esteem enhancement, Self-Concept enhancement, communication facilitation, meaningful activity facilitation, and cognitive/affective restructuring.

  • Self-Esteem Enhancement – This intervention involves the use of techniques that help the patient recognize their own worth and increase self-esteem
  • Self-Concept Enhancement – This intervention focuses on helping the patient understand their individual gifts and talents, and feeling better about their own self-image.
  • Communication Facilitation – This intervention involves helping the patient with verbal and nonverbal communication, as well as increasing their confidence with public speaking.
  • Meaningful Activity Facilitation – This intervention strives to help the patient feel engaged and find enjoyment in activities that are meaningful and fulfilling for them.
  • Cognitive/Affective Restructuring – This intervention works to help the patient effectively manage their own emotions and thoughts, as well as reduce any negative thinking patterns.

Nursing Activities

When implementing any of the listed interventions, nurses should practice cognitivebehavioral techniques, psychotherapy, goal-setting and motivational interviewing. The nurse should also practice active listening to better understand the patient’s experiences and concerns, as well as encourage independence and autonomy. Additional activities include collaborating with interdisciplinary teams, advocating for the patient’s rights, and teaching.

Conclusion

Nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity is a highly complex diagnosis that requires careful assessment and evaluation. The aim of the diagnosis is to identify and address any underlying issues or contributing factors so that the patient can receive the necessary care and treatment. Additionally, the diagnosis provides the opportunity to explore and develop effective interventions that help the patient better understand, emphasize and embrace their identity.

FAQs

  • 1. What is disturbed personal identity nursing diagnosis?
    Disturbed personal identity nursing diagnosis is defined by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) as “a vague sense of self leading to a loss of direction and purpose and deficits in self-esteem.” This diagnosis occurs when an individual experiences confusion or doubt as to who they are and what their purpose is in life.
  • 2.What are the defining characteristics of disturbed personal identity?
    The defining characteristics of disturbed personal identity nursing diagnosis include both subjective and objective signs and symptoms. Subjective indicators may include feelings of emptiness, confusion, disorientation, emptiness, or despair; loss of customary habits or routines; and a lack of beliefs or values that ordinarily are held. Objectively, changes in self-care activities, associating with negative peers, or avoidance of traditional or expected values and behaviors can be observed.
  • 3. Who is at risk for nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity?
    Individuals who are typically deemed “at-risk” for nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity include those who experience depression, anxiety, drug or alcohol abuse, PTSD, major life changes, growing older, or any serious medical conditions. Additionally, individuals who have experienced significant trauma or any sort of abuse may be at greater risk for developing issues with their personal identity.
  • 4. What are some associated conditions that may result in disturbed personal identity nursing diagnosis?
    Both physical and mental conditions can lead to the development of disturbed personal identity nursing diagnosis. Physically, conditions such as diabetes, obesity, obesity, chronic pain, neurological disorders, and dementia can all contribute to changes in self-esteem, empowerment, and identity. Emotionally, depression, fatigue, fear, and grief can all have a negative impact on someone’s sense of self.
  • 5. What are some suggested uses for the nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity?
    Nursing diagnosis of disturbed personal identity can be used when examining clinical signs, symptoms, and health histories to determine the potential underlying cause and effects of an individual’s symptoms. The diagnosis can also be helpful in identifying effective care strategies or treatments for clients or patients. Nurses should also consider using alternative diagnoses to identify and implement more effective interventions.