Dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility

Dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility

Domain 3. Elimination and exchange
Class 2. Gastrointestinal function
Diagnostic Code: 00196
Nanda label: Dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility
Diagnostic focus: Gastrointestinal motility

Nursing Diagnosis: Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility

Introduction
Nursing diagnosis is the first step towards understanding a person’s health and developing a plan of care. It helps to indicate possible problems and underlying causes, thus allowing nurses to make more informed decisions about care. In this article, we will be looking at the nursing diagnosis for Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility, which is characterized by the inability of the gastrointestinal muscles to work together to move food and other materials through the intestine to be properly digested.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition
The NANDA-I definition for Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility is ‘Impaired coordination of the muscular contractions of the gastrointestinal system, resulting in impaired passage of substances through the intestinal tract’.

Defining Characteristics
The defining characteristics of Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility include both subjective and objective elements. Subjective elements are those reported by the patient or relative before examination, such as altered appetite or feelings of abdominal fullness. Objective elements are those observed or measurable by nurse or the medical practitioner such as vomiting, abdominal distention and other signs of dehydration or malnutrition.

Related factors
A number of factors can cause or contribute to Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility. These include stress, anxiety, psychological problems, food intolerances, medications, diseases, infections and structural abnormalities that disrupt the normal functioning of the digestive system. In addition, conditions such as diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis can also interfere with the normal functioning of the digestive system.

At-risk population
People who are at risk of developing Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility are those suffering from various underlying conditions such as stress, anxiety, depression and any chronic illnesses that affect the central nervous system. In addition, people who use sedatives or take certain medications that may cause side effects, such as anticholinergics, centrally acting drugs and opioids, are also at greater risk.

Associated Conditions
A number of conditions can be associated with Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility, including constipation, gastroparesis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Other conditions such as diverticulitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and celiac disease may also contribute to the problem.

Suggestions of Use
Nurses can use a number of strategies when providing care for patients with Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility. These include managing stress, providing nutritional support and teaching relaxation techniques. In addition, nurses should encourage patients to drink adequate amounts of fluids and eat healthy, fiber-rich foods that contain complex carbohydrates and minimal saturated fats. Diet modification may also be needed to reduce specific dietary triggers.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnosis
Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnoses that may be used to diagnose patients with Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility include

  • Imbalanced Nutrition: Less than Body Requirements (NND-1010.143)
  • Excess Fluid Volume (NND-1010.1325)
  • Acute Pain (NND-1010.1955)
  • Ineffective Coping (NND-1010.158)
  • Risk for Deficient Fluid Volume (NND-1010.155)
  • Risk for Impaired Skin Integrity (NND-1010.145)

Usage Tips
When using NANDA Nursing Diagnoses, it’s important to remember to document all pertinent patient information and to look for patterns in the patient’s symptoms. The patient’s history, physical exam results, laboratory findings and diagnostic studies are all useful sources of information that can help guide selection of appropriate nursing diagnoses. Additionally, when selecting appropriate interventions, nurses should consider the patient’s psychological and social needs, as well as medical factors.

NOC Outcomes
The following are some of the most common NOC Outcomes which may be applicable when caring for patients with Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility:

  • Bowel Elimination (NOC-5590)
  • Nutritional Status (NOC-5508)
  • Bowel Continence (NOC-5589)
  • Pain Control (NOC-6722)
  • Coping (NOC-6219)
  • Fluid Balance (NOC-4360)

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria
When evaluating patients with Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility, nurses should look for improvements in the patient’s overall health and well-being, including the ability to efficiently digest and absorb nutrients, demonstrate an improved elimination pattern and maintain adequate hydration. Additional objectives and criteria to assess include the patient’s abilities to appropriately manage pain, cope effectively with stress and maintain a non-toxic nutritional intake.

NIC Interventions
Some of the most commonly used NIC Interventions for patients suffering from Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility include:

  • Gastric Intubation (NIC-5019)
  • Enteral/Tube Feeding Care (NIC-5020)
  • Pain Management (NIC-6040)
  • Bowel Management (NIC-6102)
  • Cognitive Stimulation (NIC-663)
  • Fluid/Electrolyte Management (NIC-6642)

Nursing Activities
Nursing activities for patients with Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility include monitoring nutrition levels and hydration, administering medications and other treatments, educating the patient and family on diet modifications, providing emotional support and monitoring for signs of complications related to the condition. In addition, nurses should develop an individualized plan of care for the patient and provide emotional support to help the patient cope with stress.

Conclusion
Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility is a condition that can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life. Nurses play an important role in helping patients manage their symptoms and improve their overall health. By understanding the nursing diagnosis, associated conditions, risk factors and suggested interventions, nurses can provide individualized, evidence-based care that can lead to improved outcomes for patients.

5 FAQs

  • What is Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility? Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility is an impairment in the coordination of the muscular contractions of the gastrointestinal system, resulting in impaired passage of substances through the intestinal tract.
  • What are some of the associated conditions? Associated conditions can include constipation, gastroparesis, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), diverticular disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and celiac disease.
  • What kind of interventions can nurses provide? Nurses can provide interventions such as managing stress, providing nutritional support, helping with diet modifications, encouraging drinking adequate amounts of fluids and teaching relaxation techniques.
  • What are the NOC Outcomes for Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility? The most common NOC Outcomes are Bowel Elimination, Nutritional Status, Bowel Continence, Pain Control, Coping and Fluid Balance.
  • What are the NIC Interventions for Dysfunctional Gastrointestinal Motility? Examples of NIC interventions are Gastric Intubation, Enteral/Tube Feeding Care, Pain Management, Bowel Management, Cognitive Stimulation and Fluid/Electrolyte Management.

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