Fatigue

Fatigue

Domain 4. Activity-rest
Class 3. Energy balance
Diagnostic Code: 00093
Nanda label: Fatigue
Diagnostic focus: Fatigue

Nursing diagnosis fatigue, sometimes referred to as ND fatigue, is an important concept for nurses to understand. It is a symptom of a larger medical condition, usually a chronic medical condition such as cancer, diabetes, or another disorder that can present with fatigue. The goal of diagnosing nursing diagnosis fatigue is to help nurses assess and treat the patient’s underlying medical problem so they can manage their fatigue more effectively. This article will provide information on defining characteristics, related factors, at-risk populations, associated conditions, suggestions of use, suggested alternative NANDA nursing diagnosis, usage tips, NOC Outcomes, evaluation objectives and criteria, NIC Interventions, nursing activities and wrap up with 5 frequently asked questions.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis is a globally recognized taxonomy used by nursing professionals and students to appropriately identify and classify actual or potential health problems of individuals, families, and communities. The NANDA Nursing Diagnosis for fatigue defines it as “a state of physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion that is not relieved by rest or sleep.” It is important for nurses to recognize signs and symptoms of fatigue before beginning the assessment process, as this could indicate an underlying medical condition.

Defining Characteristics

Subjectively, an individual may describe feeling tired, having no energy, and lacking interest in activities. They may also report feelings of irritability, poor appetite, sleep disturbances, and headaches. Objectively, patients may show evidence of reduced performance and alertness. They may move slowly and have difficulty concentrating when trying to perform tasks. Additionally, they may appear pale, have a decreased ability to respond rapidly, and demonstrate poor memory recall.

Related Factors

Various factors can contribute to fatigue, including physical causes, psychological causes, and environmental factors. Physical causes include acute and chronic illnesses, medications, physiological changes, lack of exercise, and poor nutrition. Psychological causes of fatigue include stress, anxiety, depression, and burnout. Environmental factors such as noise, pollution, and climate can also affect energy levels. Some individuals are more susceptible to fatigue than others, due to genetic predispositions, lifestyle decisions, and comorbidities.

At Risk Population

Certain populations are more at risk for fatigue than others. This includes individuals who are elderly, children, women, people with chronic illnesses, and people with disabilities. These populations are more likely to suffer from fatigue due to the additional challenges associated with their status, such as the need for more frequent medical interventions or the inability to engage in physical activities due to limited physical abilities.

Associated Conditions

A variety of conditions, both physical and psychological, can be associated with fatigue. Some of these conditions include anemia, thyroid diseases, sleep disorders, autoimmune disorders, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, liver disease, and depression. These conditions can lead to either physical fatigue or psychological fatigue, or both, resulting in a decrease in energy levels and overall functioning.

Suggestions of Use

Nursing diagnosis fatigue can be used to screen for underlying medical conditions that may be causing fatigue, evaluate the severity of fatigue, provide interventions to improve fatigue, and monitor the progress of treatment. Additionally, diagnosis fatigue can be used to educate patients about how to manage their fatigue and to provide referrals to other healthcare professionals as needed.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnosis

Other alternate NANDA nursing diagnosis for fatigue can include Activity Intolerance, Fatigue Syndrome, Ineffective coping, and Knowledge Deficit.

Usage Tips

When diagnosing Nursing diagnosis fatigue, it is important to take into account the patient’s history, lifestyle, and living environment, as well as any potential physical or psychological issues they may be facing. It is also important to be aware of any support systems and resources that may be available to the patient. Additionally, it is important to involve other healthcare professionals in the process of diagnosis, if necessary, as this can help prevent misdiagnoses or delays in treatment.

NOC Outcomes

Nursing diagnosis fatigue is incorporated into the nurse’s comprehensive care plan based on the NOC Outcomes. NOC stands for Nursing Outcome Classification and is a system of standardized outcomes that measure the quality of patient care. Examples of NOC outcome goals related to fatigue include Improved Activity Tolerance, Maintenance of Restful Sleep, Increased Energy Level and Improved Self-Care Management. For each goal, nurses must select appropriate intervention strategies based on the patient’s individual needs.

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria

Nurses should identify evaluation objectives and criteria when monitoring the effectiveness of interventions and determining whether the patient has achieved the desired outcome. Generally, the evaluation objectives should include documenting a reduction in fatigue, improved activity level and greater ability to complete tasks. Evaluation criteria should include the patient’s subjective report on increased energy levels, better sleep, ability to engage in activities, and improved overall functioning.

NIC Interventions

NIC stands for Nursing Interventions Classification and provides a set of standardized interventions designed to help nurses enhance the quality of patient care. Examples of NIC Interventions related to fatigue include: Encourage Adequate Rest, Provide Reassurance and Support, Monitor Medication Effectiveness, Promote Nutritional Intake, Provide Education, and Provide for Comfort. Each of these interventions must be tailored to meet the individual needs of the patient and should incorporate evidence-based practice.

Nursing Activities

Nursing activities related to fatigue management should focus on addressing the patient’s underlying medical issues and enhancing their physical, psychological, and social well-being. Examples of nursing activities to promote health and wellbeing include assessing the patient’s activity level, encouraging adequate rest and relaxation, addressing nutritional intake, providing education, promoting peer support, and providing emotional support.

Conclusion

Nursing diagnosis fatigue is a complex and multifactorial medical condition that can be difficult to manage. However, with proper understanding, assessment, and intervention, nurses can help improve the quality of life for their patients. By recognizing the signs and symptoms of fatigue, assessing the patient’s underlying medical condition and associated comorbidities, and providing evidence-based interventions and education, nurses can empower their patients to better manage their fatigue and lead healthier lives.

FAQs

  • What is Nursing Diagnosis Fatigue? Nursing diagnosis fatigue is a state of physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion that is not relieved by rest or sleep and is often a symptom of an underlying medical condition.
  • What causes fatigue? Various factors can contribute to fatigue, including physical causes, psychological causes, and environmental factors. Common causes are acute and chronic illnesses, medications, physiological changes, lack of exercise, and poor nutrition.
  • Who is most at risk for fatigue? Certain populations are more at risk for fatigue than others. This includes individuals who are elderly, children, women, people with chronic illnesses, and people with disabilities.
  • What are some alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnosis for fatigue? Other alternate NANDA nursing diagnosis for fatigue can include Activity Intolerance, Fatigue Syndrome, Ineffective coping, and Knowledge Deficit.
  • What nursing activities should be performed for fatigue management? Nursing activities related to fatigue management should focus on addressing the patient’s underlying medical issues and enhancing their physical, psychological, and social well-being. Examples of activities to promote health and wellbeing include assessing the patient’s activity level, encouraging adequate rest and relaxation, addressing nutritional intake, providing education, promoting peer support, and providing emotional support.