Risk for disturbed personal identity

Risk for disturbed personal identity

Domain 6. Self-perception
Class 1. Self-concept
Diagnostic Code: 00225
Nanda label: Risk for disturbed personal identity
Diagnostic focus: Personal identity

Nursing Diagnosis: Risk for Disturbed Personal Identity

Introduction: Nursing diagnosis is a classification of patient care based on identifying strategies that assist practitioners in individualizing care plans. One of these nursing diagnoses is risk for disturbed personal identity, which is classified as an at-risk symptom nursing diagnosis. This means it is not considered a medical diagnosis and is identified by a nurse or other health professional based on certain characteristics or indicators.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition: A state in which an individual is at risk for disruption of personal integrity, confusion about values and beliefs, and difficulty in establishing and maintaining a sense of personal meaning and purpose.

Risk Factors:

  • Exposure to traumatic events or situations.
  • Chronic or stringent illness.
  • Exposure to a sudden or prolonged lack of resources.
  • Exposure to violence, either physical or verbal.
  • Physical or sexual abuse.

At-Risk Population:

  • Children and adolescents.
  • Older adults.
  • Individuals with cognitive, emotional, psychological, or intellectual disabilities.
  • Individual with a substance use disorder.

Associated Conditions:

  • Depression.
  • Anxiety.
  • Identity disturbances.
  • Low self-esteem.
  • Behavioral disturbances.
  • Lack of trust in others.
  • Social isolation.
  • Hallucinations.

Suggestions of Use: Nurses should identify potential triggers of disturbed personal identity and develop interventions aimed at addressing the physiological, psychosocial, spiritual, and environmental needs of the affected individual.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnoses:

  • Ineffective Role Performance
  • Impaired Social Interaction
  • Spiritual Distress
  • Impaired Home Maintenance
  • Powerlessness

Usage Tips: When using the NANDA nursing diagnosis for risk for disturbed personal identity, it is recommended to evaluate the patient’s risk factors and associated conditions, as well as their current functional status in order to develop an effective individualized care plan.

NOC Outcomes:

  • Personal Well-being: At the patient’s highest level of function, they will be able to meet their own self-care needs, demonstrate behaviors that indicate a positive attitude toward life, and have a positive self-image and sense of autonomy.
  • Social Interaction: At the patient’s highest level of function, they will be able to collaborate with members of their social support system and demonstrate social problem-solving skills.
  • Coping: At the patient’s highest level of function, they will be able to utilize healthy coping mechanisms in stressful situations and demonstrate adaptive behaviors.
  • Self-Concept: At the patient’s highest level of function, they will be able to display an accurate understanding of their strengths, weaknesses, and goals.
  • Interpersonal Relationships: At the patient’s highest level of function, they will be able to cultivate and maintain meaningful relationships.

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria: To accurately evaluate the progress of a patient with a risk for disturbed personal identity, health practitioners must look at variables such as patient self-report, behavior observation, and objective tests that assess learning and psychomotor skills.

NIC Interventions:

  • Intervention Management: Design and implement interventions that teach the patient techniques to cope with stress, conserve energy, and establish/maintain a sense of personal identity.
  • Psychosocial Support: Provide appropriate supportive listening, guidance, and encouragement to enable patient to vocalize feelings and experiences.
  • Medication Management: Monitor effectiveness of medications; adjust dose and type of intervention when appropriate.
  • Self Care Facilitation: Provide opportunities and instruction regarding developmentally appropriate activities related to self-care.
  • Family Education: Instruct family/caregivers on therapeutic interventions; help them develop coping strategies.

Nursing Activities: Examples of nursing activities include providing emotional support, identifying patient goals and tailoring the care plan accordingly, reinforcing teaching done by family members, monitoring patient behavior and vitals to detect possible distress, encouraging participation in leisure activities, and sustaining communication with multidisciplinary team members.

Conclusion: Risk for disturbed personal identity can be adversely impacted by a variety of factors such as trauma, illness, abuse, and violence. Identifying and managing these risk factors is essential in minimizing the likelihood of this disorder developing. Implementing various interventions, such as psychosocial support, family education, and medication management, among others, can help to maintain patient personal identity and promote positive outcomes.

5 FAQs:

  1. What is Risk for Disturbed Personal Identity? Risk for disturbed personal identity is a state in which an individual is at risk for disruption of personal integrity, confusion about values and beliefs, and difficulty in establishing and maintaining a sense of personal meaning and purpose.
  2. What are the Risk Factors Associated with Risk for Disturbed Personal Identity? The risk factors associated with risk for disturbed personal identity include exposure to traumatic events or situations, chronic or stringent illness, exposure to a sudden or prolonged lack of resources, exposure to violence, and physical or sexual abuse.
  3. What Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnoses Should be Considered? Some alternative NANDA nursing diagnoses to consider for a patient at risk for disturbed personal identity are ineffective role performance, impaired social interaction, spiritual distress, impaired home maintenance, and powerlessness.
  4. What NOC Outcomes Should be Evaluated when Assessing Risk for Disturbed Personal Identity? When assessing risk for disturbed personal identity, some NOC outcomes that should be evaluated include personal well-being, social interaction, coping, self-concept, and interpersonal relationships.
  5. What Nursing Activities are Used to Manage Risk for Disturbed Personal Identity? Nursing activities used to manage risk for disturbed personal identity include providing emotional support, assisting with goal setting and tailoring care plans, reinforcing teaching done by family members, monitoring patient behavior, and sustaining communication with multidisciplinary team members.

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