Risk for elopement attempt

Risk for elopement attempt

Domain 1.Health promotion
Class 2. Health management
Diagnostic Code: 00290
Nanda label: Risk for elopement attempt
Diagnostic focus: Elopement attempt

Introduction to Nursing Diagnosis: Risk for Elopement Attempt

Nursing diagnosis is an important aspect of providing quality health care, as it helps nurses to better know and understand their patients. The concept of nursing diagnosis was developed in the 1940s, when a need to develop effective nursing interventions, based on the individual needs of each patient, was identified. In this context, the purpose of nursing diagnosis is to identify potential and actual health problems, assess the needs of the individual, and promote the implementation of appropriate clinical nursing interventions. In this article, we will explore nursing diagnosis related to “Risk for Elopement Attempt”, which is defined as the risk of departure from a safe or appropriate environment without the knowledge or consent of guardians or healthcare providers.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition

The NANDA-International (NANDA-I) list published in 2018 includes a suggested nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt”. This diagnosis refers to the potential risk of an individual attempting to leave without the knowledge or consent of their caregivers/caregivers or healthcare providers. The biological basis for this diagnosis is related to issues that can affect the individual’s safety and well-being, including reduced alertness, orientation issues, cognitive or physical disability, or environmental factors that might lead the individual to attempt to elope.

Risk Factors

There are several risk factors that may increase the risk of elopement attempts in a person. These can include:

  • Unattended exits and access points: Having easy, unguarded access to potentially dangerous locations, such as highways, public parks, and other exposed areas, can be extremely risky. All exterior access points should be secured, with metal bars, depth sensors and locks that are constantly checked and monitored.
  • Cognitive impairments: Understanding of their environments and potential dangers can be compromised in individuals with cognitive impairments, thus increasing the likelihood of them attempting to elope. Such impairments can arise due to dementia, autism, intellectual disability, and other conditions.
  • Poor communication skills: Inability to effectively communicate verbal and/or nonverbal cues can increase the chance of elopement attempts. This can be characterized by difficulty in making decisions or organizing thoughts, lack of an effective support network, and inability to appropriately express emotions.
  • Behavioral disorders: People suffering from behavioral problems can be prone to elopement attempts, particularly if the behaviors are extreme, impulsive or too demanding. This can include aggressive behavior, self-injurious behavior, and exhibiting an unpredictable pattern of behavior.
  • History of abuse or neglect: Individuals who have experienced abuse or neglect may be more likely to attempt to elope, as they may feel unsafe in their environment or may not have trust in the people around them.

At Risk Population

At-risk populations for elopement attempts include individuals with impaired cognition, physical disabilities, language barriers, poor communication skills, behavioral issues, and individuals with a history of abuse or neglect.

Young children are especially at risk, as they often lack the ability to aprize danger and may attempt to elope if parents and caregivers are not there to monitor them. The elderly population is also at a higher risk for elopement attempts, as cognitive deficits or impairments can lead them to become disconnected from their environment or wander off in confusion.

Finally, individuals suffering from psychiatric or medical conditions may be at a higher risk for attempting to elope, particularly if their condition affects their ability to accurately assess their environment, or if they are suffering from impairments in communication, judgment or decision-making.

Associated Conditions

A variety of associated conditions can further increase the risk of elopement attempts. These can include physical signs of agitation and restlessness; difficulty in understanding and reacting appropriately to dangerous situation; restricted mobility or lack of adequate mobility aids; history of fleeing; and any feelings of being unsafe or uncomfortable in their current environment.

Additionally, associated conditions may include inability to make informed decisions or take appropriate action, signs of depression or anxiety, homelessness, drug or alcohol abuse, and history of trauma. On a physiological level, individuals experiencing low blood sugar, confusion, hallucinations, sensory deficits, and delirium may also be more likely to attempt to elope.

Suggestions for Use

Nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt” is best used in conjunction with other nursing diagnoses to create a holistic picture of the individual’s health. When assessing an individual for elopement risk, it is important to consider their overall physical and mental well-being, as well as past medical and mental health history.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnoses

In addition to “Risk for Elopement Attempt”, other alternative NANDA-I nursing diagnoses that may be considered include “Impaired Verbal Communication”, “Impulsivity”, “Risk for Injury”, “Risk-Prone Health Behavior”, “Social Isolation”, “Activity Intolerance” and “Social Interaction Anxiety”. All of these nursing diagnoses can provide a more comprehensive view of elopement risk in patients.

Usage Tips

When using nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt”, it is important to note that this diagnosis is not a standalone diagnosis. It must always be used in conjunction with other nursing diagnoses to create a comprehensive assessment of the individual’s risk of elopement attempts.

It is also important to remember that nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt” is meant to be a guide, not an exact prediction of what will happen. It is not possible to fully predict when and how an elopement attempt might occur; instead, this diagnosis should provide a better understanding of potential elopement risks and guide interventions accordingly.

NOC Outcomes

Nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt” is focused on helping individuals stay safe and prevent attempts of eloping from a safe environment or caregiver’s presence. The following NOC outcomes for this nursing diagnosis provides evidence of successful intervention.

  • Safety Status: This outcome examines the individual’s level of safety and will indicate if proper precautions have been taken to protect them from potential elopement attempts.
  • Risk Control: This outcome evaluates the individual’s ability to understand and manage potential risks related to eloping, such as hazardous locations, access points, or hazardous items.
  • Orientation: Indicates the level of orientation the individual has in relation to their immediate surroundings and the potential risks associated with it.
  • Self-Care: Measures the individual’s ability to take measures themselves to ensure their own safety, including verbal and nonverbal communication, decision-making, and behavior.
  • Social Interactions: Examines the individual’s ability to interact with their environment and others in a safe and supportive way.

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria

The evaluation objectives and criteria for nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt” should focus on whether others perceive the individual as safe, and if proper measures are being taken to ensure the individual’s safety. Evaluation should include assessments of:

  • The individual’s Perception of hazards in their environment
  • Ability to communicate verbally and nonverbally
  • Ability to make appropriate decisions to ensure their safety
  • Level of safety provided by their current environment
  • Adequacy of measures to protect them from potential elopement attempts

NIC Interventions (with )

The NIC interventions for nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt” should focus on protecting the individual from potential harm, maintaining the individual’s safety, and fostering a sense of security. These interventions may include:

  • Safety Surveillance: Consists of monitoring the environment for any potential hazards that may increase the likelihood of elopement attempts.
  • Consultation: Seek advice from medical or mental health professionals to help identify and control any factors that may increase the risk of elopement attempts.
  • Therapeutic Communication: Utilize verbal and nonverbal communication techniques to foster feelings of safety and security in the individual, while encouraging healthy social interaction.
  • Environmental Modification: Make the environment safe and secure by modifying access points, labels, and any potential hazards.
  • Education: Educate the individual and provide resources to help them understand the risks associated with eloping, as well as how to protect themselves against such risks.

Nursing Activities

Nursing activities for “Risk for Elopement Attempt” should focus on providing the individual with a safe, comfortable and secure environment to foster therapeutic communication and encourage positive social interactions. This can be accomplished through implementing physical and environmental intervention, including:

  • Monitoring their environment to identify potential hazards and access points.
  • Maintaining constant contact with the individual and ensuring the safety of their environment at all times.
  • Educating the individual about the risks of eloping and on ways to protect themselves from such risks.
  • Utilizing verbal and nonverbal communication strategies to foster social support.
  • Providing constant emotional support and reassurance to the individual.

Conclusion

Nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt” is essential for the care of individuals who may be vulnerable to running away from their safe environment or care givers. The main goal of this diagnosis is to identify potential risks and intervene appropriately to minimize the likelihood of an elopement attempt occuring. Evaluation criteria focuses on whether measures are being taken to keep the individual safe and secure, while goals and interventions concentrate on protecting the individual from potential harms and encouraging development of appropriate social interactions.

5 FAQs

1. What is Nursing Diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt”?

Nursing diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt” is defined as the potential risk of an individual attempting to leave without the knowledge or consent of their caregivers or healthcare providers.

2. What are the Risk Factors Associated with Elopement Attempts?

Risk factors for attempting to elope include unattended exits and access points, cognitive impairments, poor communication skills, behavioral disorders, and a history of abuse or neglect.

3. Who is at Risk for Elopement Attempts?

At-risk populations for elopement attempts include individuals with cognitive, physical, and language impairments, behavioral issues, and any history of abuse or neglect. Young children and the elderly are also especially at risk.

4. What are the Evaluation Objectives and Criteria for Nursing Diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt”?

Evaluation criteria for this diagnosis should focus on whether others perceive the individual as safe, and if proper measures are being taken to ensure the individual’s safety. Evaluation should include assessments of the individual’s perception of hazards, communication skills, decision-making, and the level of safety provided by their current environment.

5. What are the NIC Interventions for Nursing Diagnosis of “Risk for Elopement Attempt”?

NIC interventions for this diagnosis should focus on protecting the individual from potential harm and maintaining their safety. These interventions may include safety surveillance, consultation, therapeutic communication, environmental modification, and education.