Risk for female genital mutilation

Risk for female genital mutilation

Domain 11. Safety-protection
Class 3. Violence
Diagnostic Code: 00272
Nanda label: Risk for female genital mutilation
Diagnostic focus: Female genital mutilation

Nursing Diagnosis for Risk for Female Genital Mutilation

The problem of Female Genital Mutilation (often referred to as FGM) is a serious one, affecting millions of women and girls around the world. FGM can cause physical and psychological harm to those affected and puts them at risk of long-term medical conditions and even death. As a result, it’s essential that nurses be aware of risk factors in order to screen and provide appropriate care and support for those affected by it. In this article, we’ll discuss what Nursing Diagnosis for Risk for Female Genital Mutilation is and how it can be applied to help healthcare practitioners improve care and safety for patients who may be at risk of FGM.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis for Risk for Female Genital Mutilation Definition

According to the NANDA International Nursing Diagnosis Association, Nursing Diagnosis for Risk for Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is defined as “a situation in which an individual does not have the protective immunities or social environment for protection from FGM.” In other words, this diagnosis aims to assess and identify signs of potential FGM vulnerability so that healthcare professionals are able to evaluate an individual’s risk of being exposed to the practice.

Risk Factors

There are a number of risk factors associated with FGM that healthcare professionals need to be aware of in order to properly assess an individual’s risk. These include:

  • Age: Girls and women aged between 4 and 14 years old are particularly vulnerable to FGM due to their young age and lack of control.
  • Family History: Those with families where FGM has been practiced historically are more likely to be at higher risk.
  • Geographical Location: Those living in geographic areas where FGM is culturally accepted and/or actively practiced are more likely to be exposed to the practice.
  • Social Environment: Those living in communities where FGM is accepted are more likely to be exposed to the practice.
  • Economic Situation: Those living in poverty are more likely to be exposed to FGM due to limited resources and options available to them.

At-Risk Population

Certain populations are at an increased risk of FGM due to their cultural background or geographical location. Examples include:

  • African Communities: Those living in African countries where FGM is culturally accepted are more likely to be exposed to it. These include Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Egypt, Mauritania, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen.
  • Middle Eastern/North African Communities: Those living in Middle Eastern or North African countries where FGM is culturally accepted are more likely to be exposed to it. These include Iraq, Oman, Saudi Arabia, and Syria.
  • Indigenous Communities: Those living in Indigenous communities where FGM is culturally accepted are more likely to be exposed to it. Examples include the Maasai in Kenya, the ASR/HIVA community in Somalia, and the Yezidi in Iraq.

Suggestions for Use

In order to provide effective screening and care for those at risk of FGM, healthcare practitioners should employ the following strategies:

  • Be aware of the risk factors for FGM and the populations most likely to be exposed, and use this information to assess each patient’s risk.
  • Screen patients for risk factors and listen carefully to any concerns they may have about FGM.
  • Provide education and counseling on the risks and dangers of FGM.
  • Refer patients to FGM prevention programs or specialized healthcare services if needed.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnosis

In addition to Nursing Diagnosis for Risk for Female Genital Mutilation, healthcare practitioners may consider the following alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnoses to better assess a patient’s risk:

  • Risk for Injury Related to FGM: This diagnosis is used to assess the patient’s risk of physical harm from FGM.
  • Fear Related to FGM: This diagnosis is used to assess the patient’s fear or anxiety related to the possibility of FGM.
  • Powerlessness Related to FGM: This diagnosis is used to assess the patient’s sense of helplessness or lack of control over the possibility of being exposed to FGM.
  • Noncompliance with Medical Regime Related to FGM: This diagnosis is used to assess the patient’s potential lack of compliance with medical advice related to FGM.

Usage Tips

When using Nursing Diagnosis for Risk for Female Genital Mutilation, it is important for healthcare practitioners to remember the following:

  • Screening does not guarantee safety and must be combined with appropriate education, counseling, and referral.
  • Risk assessment should involve a thorough review of all known risk factors.
  • It is important to use a combination of approaches appropriate for each individual patient.
  • Referral to specialized healthcare services should be considered when necessary.

NOC Outcomes

When assessing the effectiveness of care related to risk for FGM, the following NOC Outcomes are useful:

  • Risk Assessment: This outcome measures the patient’s ability to accurately assess their risk of being exposed to FGM.
  • Self-care Education: This outcome measures the patient’s knowledge of FGM risk factors and measures they can take to protect themselves.
  • Self-Efficacy: This outcome measures the patient’s confidence in their ability to make good decisions and seek the necessary help and support in relation to FGM.
  • Coping Self-Statement: This outcome measures the patient’s ability to utilize coping statements to alleviate fear and distress in relation to FGM.

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria

When evaluating care related to risk for FGM, healthcare practitioners should use the following criteria:

  • Patient Satisfaction: Does the patient report feeling supported and empowered by the care they have received?
  • Risk Assessment Accuracy: Is the patient able to accurately assess their risk of being exposed to FGM?
  • Self-Care Knowledge: Does the patient have an appropriate understanding of the risk factors for FGM and strategies for avoiding it?
  • Self-Efficacy: Does the patient feel confident in their ability to make good decisions and protect themselves from FGM?
  • Coping Self-Statements Accuracy: Are the patient’s coping statements accurate and appropriate for their specific risk factors?

NIC Interventions

The following NIC Interventions may be useful in providing care related to risk for FGM:

  • Health Promotion Education: This intervention aims to provide information and support related to FGM risk factors, interventions, and referrals.
  • Behavioral Counseling and Therapy: This intervention aims to provide patient-centered psychosocial counseling and supportive therapy.
  • Screening for FGM Risk Factors: This intervention aims to provide accurate and up-to-date FGM risk assessments.
  • Community Referrals: This intervention aims to provide referrals to appropriate resources within the patient’s community.

Nursing Activities

In order to provide care related to risk for FGM, the following nursing activities are recommended:

  • Educate patients about FGM and provide counseling on the risks and consequences associated with it.
  • Screen patients for FGM risk factors and identify individuals most at risk.
  • Assess patient needs and provide evidence-based interventions, as appropriate.
  • Refer patients to FGM prevention programs and/or specialized healthcare services, as needed.
  • Provide ongoing support and follow-up, as appropriate.

Conclusion

Through careful screening and assessment, healthcare professionals are able to identify and assess individuals who may be at risk for Female Genital Mutilation and provide appropriate care and support. By implementing the strategies outlined above and utilising the alternative NANDA Nursing Diagnoses and corresponding NIC Interventions, healthcare professionals are better able to address this important issue and ensure that every patient is safe from the harm associated with FGM.

5 FAQs

  • What is Nursing Diagnosis for Risk for Female Genital Mutilation? – Nursing Diagnosis for Risk for Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a diagnosis used by healthcare practitioners to assess and identify signs of potential FGM vulnerability so that they may provide appropriate care and support.
  • What are the risk factors associated with FGM? – The risk factors associated with FGM include age, family history, geographical location, social environment, and economic situation.
  • Which populations are at an increased risk of FGM? – Populations at an increased risk of FGM include those living in African, Middle Eastern/North African, and Indigenous communities; those where FGM is culturally accepted or practiced.
  • What strategies should healthcare providers use to provide effective care related to FGM risk? – Healthcare providers should be aware of the risk factors for FGM and the populations most likely to be exposed. They should also provide education and counseling on the risks and dangers of FGM and should refer patients to FGM prevention programs or specialized healthcare services if needed.
  • What are the NOC Outcomes used to assess the effectiveness of care related to risk of FGM? – The NOC Outcomes used to assess the effectiveness of care related to risk of FGM are Risk Assessment, Self-care Education, Self-Efficacy, and Coping Self-Statement.

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