Risk for unstable blood glucose level

Risk for unstable blood glucose level

Domain 2. Nutrition
Class 4. Metabolism
Diagnostic Code: 00179
Nanda label: Risk for unstable blood glucose level
Diagnostic focus: Blood glucose level

Introduction to Nursing Diagnosis: Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level

Nursing diagnosis is defined as an on-going process of assessment, diagnosis, outcomes identification, planning, implementation, and evaluation of victims or patients experiencing actual or potential health problems or life processes. Nursing diagnosis plays an important role in the care of a patient by guiding nurses towards meeting the needs of a patient in order to maintain their health. The nursing diagnosis ‘Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level’ (UBGL) is a type of nursing diagnosis that occurs when patients have elevated risks of developing abnormal blood glucose levels. In this article, we will discuss the definition of this diagnosis and the risk factors associated, along with the at-risk populations, the suggested alternative diagnoses, usage tips, the list of Nursing Outcomes Classifications (NOC), evaluation objectives and criteria, list of Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC), and nursing activities involved.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition: Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level

The NANDA nursing diagnosis definition of Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level is “at risk to demonstrate hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia due to alteration of circulating serum glucose concentration, hormone changes, insulin imbalance, or nutrient patterns.” This diagnosis is most often applicable to patients who are at high risk of developing chronic illnesses or are already ill, such as those with diabetes, and those on medication that may cause blood sugar instability.

Risk Factors

When it comes to assessing the risk of developing an unstable blood glucose level, some factors can contribute to a patient’s likelihood of being affected. Patients with an existing diagnosis of diabetes type 1 or type 2 have a higher risk, as well as pregnant women who have gestational diabetes and are suffering from polycystic ovarian syndrome, or PCOS. Regulated medicine intake, such as insulin, sulfonylureas, repaglinide, and metformin can lead to an increased risk of UBGL. Also, poor dietary choices including excessive sugar-rich foods and beverages, experiences of physiological stresses can lead to blood sugar instability.

At-Risk Population

The populations most at risk for an unstable blood glucose level are those who are diagnosed with underlying medical illnesses such as diabetes, those who take medication that can affect blood sugar, those who follow a poor diet and experience physiological stressors. Elderly individuals are especially at risk of having increasingly unstable blood glucose levels due to age-related hormone changes and the side-effects of the medications they take. Pregnant women with gestational diabetes and those with polycystic ovarian syndrome are also at increased risk of developing UBGL.

Associated Conditions

Unstable blood glucose levels are often accompanied by a few associated conditions that indicate whether a patient is more likely to be affected by the diagnosis. These can include dehydration, hypothermia, cardiovascular exhaustion, symptomatic cardiac events, renal failure, coma, fatigue and dehydration, and altered levels of consciousness.

Suggestions of Use

The diagnosis of risk for unstable blood glucose levels can be used to aid nursing assessments of risk to alert the nurse to a potential problem, as well as aid in the development of strategies to empower the patient to better manage their blood glucose levels. This includes providing information, lifestyle modification advice, and informational resources to help educate the patient. It can also help the nurse determine appropriate medical follow-up and appropriate nurses’ interventions.

Suggested Alternative Nursing Diagnoses

There are several alternative nursing diagnoses that can be used to evaluate situations related to unstable blood glucose levels. These diagnoses include Imbalance Nutrition: More Than Body Requirements, Deficient Fluid Volume, Activity Intolerance, Impaired Skin Integrity, Risk for Hyperthermia, Anxiety, Fatigue and Altered Comfort.

Usage Tips

When using the diagnosis of Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level to assess a patient, it is important to note that this diagnosis is not a substitute for a medical diagnosis. It should be used as a tool to help identify risk factors, assess the patient’s current condition and measure the efficacy of any intervening efforts. When identifying the diagnosis and its associated risks, it is also important to consider age-specific risk factors and the patient’s pre-existing condition in order to ensure an accurate assessment.

List of NOC Outcome

The Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) outcome associated with the Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level diagnosis include Fluids & Electrolytes Balance, Glucose Level Control, Knowledge: Disorders of Glucose Regulation, and Self-care: Diabetes Management.

Fluids & Electrolytes Balance describes the patient’s ability to regulate their body fluids according to age related norms. Glucose Level Control assesses the patient’s efficacy in maintaining safe levels of glucose throughout the day. Knowledge: Disorders of Glucose Regulation evaluates the patient’s understanding of the body’s glucose regulation system. Finally, Self-care: Diabetes Management investigates the patient’s ability to monitor and manage their own diabetes.

Evaluation Objectives and Criteria

When evaluating the efficacy of interventions and outcomes related to the Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level diagnosis, it is important to pay attention to the objective and criteria of each. The evaluation objectives of this diagnosis involve the patient’s safety, the ability to regulate glucose levels, the understanding of the tissues and organs involved in glucose regulation, and the capacity for self-management. The criteria for evaluating each objective include factual knowledge of glucose regulation, demonstration of the ability to utilize glucose meters to check for glucose levels, and the ability to modify lifestyle for disease management.

NIC Interventions

The Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) interventions associated with Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level diagnosis include Monitor Glucose Levels, Integrate Self-Care Behaviors, Administer Insulin, Provide Health Education and Teach Self-monitoring. Monitor Glucose Levels involves the use of tools such as the glucose meter to regularly check glucose levels. Integrate Self-Care Behaviors demonstrates how to effectively manage diabetes related behaviors through diet, exercise and medications. Administer Insulin outlines the procedure for accurately administering insulin injections. Provide Health Education provides factual information regarding diabetes management. Finally, Teach Self-Monitoring addresses methods for correctly instructing patients on how to properly use diabetes meters.

Nursing Activities

In order to meet the objectives and criteria for the diagnosis of Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level, nurses must undertake a variety of activities. These activities include but are not limited to monitoring and assisting with medication administration, providing health education and instructions, recommending dietary and lifestyle changes, operating a glucose meter to check for changes/measurements, supporting family and social support systems, and monitoring for other signs and symptoms of diabetic complications.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the diagnosis of Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level is an important way to assess the risk of developing abnormal glucose levels. By understanding the risk factors, at-risk populations, associated conditions, and nursing activities involved, nurses can better assess, diagnose, and treat patients with UBGL by providing them with evidence-based care and education.

5 FAQs

1. What is the NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition of Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level?
The NANDA Nursing Diagnosis definition is “at risk to demonstrate hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia due to alteration of circulating serum glucose concentration, hormone changes, insulin imbalance, or nutrient patterns.”

2. Who is Most At-Risk for Developing Unstable Blood Glucose Level?
Patients most at-risk for developing UBGL include those with underlying medical conditions, especially diabetes, those who take regulated medicines, those who experience physiological stressors, and those who follow a poor diet. Elderly people and pregnant women with gestational diabetes or PCOS are also at increased risk.

3. What Are the Associated Conditions of UBGL?
The associated conditions of UBGL include dehydration, hypothermia, cardiovascular exhaustion, symptomatic cardiac events, renal failure, coma, fatigue and dehydration, and altered levels of consciousness.

4. What Are the Uses of the UBGL Nursing Diagnosis?
The uses of the UBGL diagnosis include aiding nursing assessments to identify potential problems, providing information and resources to patients, determining appropriate medical follow-up and nurses’ interventions, and measuring the efficacy of intervening efforts.

5. What Are the Objectives, Criteria and Activities Involved With UBGL?
The objectives of UBGL involve the patient’s safety, glucose level regulation, knowledge of glucose regulation, and self-management. The criteria for evaluating each objective include knowledge, demonstration of the use of a glucose meter to check levels and modification of lifestyle. Nursing activities include monitoring and assisting with medication administration, providing health education and instructions, recommending dietary and lifestyle changes, operating a glucose meter and monitoring for other signs and symptoms of diabetic complications.

{
“@context”: “https://schema.org”,
“@type”: “FAQPage”,
“mainEntity”: [
{
“@type”: “Question”,
“name”: “What is the NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition of Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Level?”,
“acceptedAnswer”: {
“@type”: “Answer”,
“text”: “The NANDA Nursing Diagnosis definition is “at risk to demonstrate hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia due to alteration of circulating serum glucose concentration, hormone changes, insulin imbalance, or nutrient patterns.””
}
},
{
“@type”: “Question”,
“name”: “Who is Most At-Risk for Developing Unstable Blood Glucose Level?”,
“acceptedAnswer”: {
“@type”: “Answer”,
“text”: “Patients most at-risk for developing UBGL include those with underlying medical conditions, especially diabetes, those who take regulated medicines, those who experience physiological stressors, and those who follow a poor diet. Elderly people and pregnant women with gestational diabetes or PCOS are also at increased risk.”
}
},
{
“@type”: “Question”,
“name”: “What Are the Associated Conditions of UBGL?”,
“acceptedAnswer”: {
“@type”: “Answer”,
“text”: “The associated conditions of UBGL include dehydration, hypothermia, cardiovascular exhaustion, symptomatic cardiac events, renal failure, coma, fatigue and dehydration, and altered levels of consciousness.”
}
},
{
“@type”: “Question”,
“name”: “What Are the Uses of the UBGL Nursing Diagnosis?”,
“acceptedAnswer”: {
“@type”: “Answer”,
“text”: “The uses of the UBGL diagnosis include aiding nursing assessments to identify potential problems, providing information and resources to patients, determining appropriate medical follow-up and nurses’ interventions, and measuring the efficacy of intervening efforts.”
}
},
{
“@type”: “Question”,
“name”: “What Are the Objectives, Criteria and Activities Involved With UBGL?”,
“acceptedAnswer”: {
“@type”: “Answer”,
“text”: “The objectives of UBGL involve the patient’s safety, glucose level regulation, knowledge of glucose regulation, and self-management. The criteria for evaluating each objective include knowledge, demonstration of the use of a glucose meter to check levels and modification of lifestyle. Nursing activities include monitoring and assisting with medication administration, providing health education and instructions, recommending dietary and lifestyle changes, operating a glucose meter and monitoring for other signs and symptoms of diabetic complications.”
}
}
]
}